Dating homer laughlin dishes

dating homer laughlin dishes

How do you date Homer Laughlin China?

Locate the pottery mark on the piece of Homer Laughlin china. Often it is found on the bottom of the piece. Find the date code. It is located at the bottom of the mark. For instance, the code at the bottom of one mark reads, “J 39 N 8.” The J 39 is the date code while the N 8 is code for the plant where the piece was produced.

What do the codes on the back of Homer Laughlin dinnerware mean?

There is a lot of confusion around what the codes mean on the back of most Homer Laughlin Dinnerware Items. An Example of the codes we are referring to would be: K 53 N 8 The Homer Laughlin Code, Back-Stamp or more officially - the “Mark” is not a reference to a Pattern Code, but is really a Date Stamp and Factory of Origin Code.

What is the history of the Homer Laughlin China Company?

The Homer Laughlin China Company has marked their wares with a wide variety of backstamps. Shown to the right is an early Laughlin Brothers mark on a Cable shape sauceboat. Although the company started in the early 1870s, marks were not given any type of dating system until around 1912.

What kind of dinnerware did Homer Laughlin make?

Fiesta, a brightly colored line of dinnerware introduced in 1936, was Homer Laughlin China Company’s greatest success. Frederick Hurten Rhead, who descended from a family of highly regarded English ceramicists, had previously worked for both Weller Pottery and Roseville Pottery before joining Homer Laughlin in 1927.

How do you read date codes on Homer Laughlin?

Decipher the date code Pull out your Homer Laughlin database or book to help you decipher the date code. From 1911 to 1921, the date codes had no letters, just numbers. For instance, a piece made in Jan. 1916 has a date code of 1 6. The one represents January, and the 6 represents 1916.

How many pieces of China did Homer Laughlin make a day?

By 1908, the Homer Laughlin China Company was producing 300,000 pieces a day, according to Homer Laughlin: Decades of Dinnerware by Bob Page (Replacements, Ltd.). In 1916 more kilns were added, and by 1920 the company could not keep up with demand.

What is a Homer Laughlin back-stamp?

The Homer Laughlin Code, Back-Stamp or more officially - the “Mark” is not a reference to a Pattern Code, but is really a Date Stamp and Factory of Origin Code. We will go into a lot more detail in a future posting, but basically the first Letter, (the “K” in the example above) is the month of Manufacture, (“A” - January, “B” – February, etc.).

What is the pattern number on a Homer Laughlin Bowl?

To add to the confusion, there are some Homer Laughlin Serving Bowls, Platters and other Pieces that actually do have the Pattern Number stamped on the back alongside the aforementioned Date Code. An Example of a “Pattern Code” would be “VR-128”, “N1670” or “G3391”.

What kind of pottery did Homer Laughlin make?

Homer Laughlin China Company In 1870, Homer and Shakespeare Laughlin established Laughlin Pottery, consisting of two pottery kilns in East Liverpool, Ohio. The firm made whiteware, an ironstone utilitarian ceramic form. Shakespeare left the company in 1879.

What happened to Homer Laughlin?

He went to work looking at new shapes and glazes as part of expanding Homer Laughlin’s lines, and designing Fiesta was one of his achievements. Older Fiesta dinnerware is a perennial favorite among collectors. New Fiesta is still sold in department stores and other outlets today. Homer Laughlin China Co. made thousands of patterns of china.

How many pieces of China did Homer Laughlin make a day?

By 1908, the Homer Laughlin China Company was producing 300,000 pieces a day, according to Homer Laughlin: Decades of Dinnerware by Bob Page (Replacements, Ltd.). In 1916 more kilns were added, and by 1920 the company could not keep up with demand.

What is the history of Laughlin China Company pottery?

Homer Laughlin China Company established a small pottery -- one of the first white-ware plants in the United States -- in early 1870s. The two-kiln firm, located in East Liverpool, Ohio, was first founded by brothers Homer and Shakespeare Laughlin as Ohio Valley Pottery. It later became Laughlin Bros., according to Warman’s Antiques & Collectibles.

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